Librarian

Propaganda posters created by famous painters – Kazimir Malevich

2015-10-24

Couple of World War I propaganda posters created by Kazimir Malevich.

Wilhelm’s Merry-Go-Round.  Kazimir Malevich – 1914.

Wilhelm's Merry-Go-Round, Kazimir Malevich - 1914

This World War I propaganda poster, designed by Kazimir Malevich with a caption by the poet Vladimir Mayakovsky, depicts the German army defeated by the Allies on the outskirts of Paris in the fall of 1914. On the right, German soldiers are seen dying under a barrage of artillery. Gunfire belches from behind the city walls of Paris, visible in the top-left corner. In the center the figure of Kaiser Wilhelm II helplessly observes the collapse of the German offensive. The verse by Vladimir Mayakovsky reads: “My army is being beaten near Paris, but I’m running in circles unable to do anything.”

 

A Sausage Maker Came to Lodz. We Said to Him: “Welcome, Sir!…”. Kazimir Malevich – 1914.

A Sausage Maker Came to Lodz, Kazimir Malevich - 1914

This World War I propaganda poster, designed by Kazimir Malevich with a caption by the poet Vladimir Mayakovsky, depicts a Russian peasant and defeated  German Army . The oversized peasant on the left panel is greeting the German emperor, who moves towards him with his army of cheerful soldiers, confident of victory. On the right side, the peasant walks away after having crushed the enemy. With his army destroyed, the emperor is dismayed. The verse by Vladimir Mayakovsky reads: “A sausage maker came to Lodz. We said to him ‘Welcome, sir!’ Then from Radom, which is next to Lodz, he left with a bruised bottom.” The poster refers to the 1914 Battle of Lódź (present-day Poland).

 

The French Allies Have a Cart Filled with Captured Germans. Kazimir Malevich – 1914

The French Allies Have a Cart Filled with Captured Germans. Kazimir Malevich - 1914

This World War I propaganda poster, designed by Kazimir Malevich with a caption by the poet Vladimir Mayakovsky, depicts French and British soldiers carrying off captured German soldiers in a cart and a tub. The verse by Vladimir Mayakovsky reads: “Our French allies have a cart full of dead Germans, and our English brothers – a whole basket too.”

 

What Crackle, What Thunder. Kazimir Malevich – 1914

What Crackle, What Thunder

This World War I propaganda poster designed by Kazimir Malevich with a caption by the poet Vladimir Mayakovsky, refers to a battle near Lomza (present-day Poland), where despite initial success, the Russians suffered heavy losses. A heroic Russian peasant figure slashing German soldiers with his scythe dominates the view. His traditional dress and lapti (woven bark shoes) seem to epitomize Russia’s strength and invincibility. German soldiers are running away or lie dead. The verse by Vladimir Mayakovsky reads:: “What crackle, what thunder there was from the Germans at Lomza!”

 

Look, just look, the Vistula is near. Kazimir Malevich – 1914.

Look, just look, the Vistula is near

This World War I propaganda poster designed by Kazimir Malevich with a caption by the poet Vladimir Mayakovsky. The verse by Vladimir Mayakovsky reads: “Look, just look, the Vistula is near. the Germans’ bellies are swelling, let’s have ‘em for dinner!”